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Event Calendar for Katsushika, Tokyo
Check Out All the Year's Festivities!

STORY

 

Event Calendar for Katsushika, Tokyo
Check Out All the Year's Festivities!

 

 
 
Katsushika City is a popular part of the Shitamachi area of Tokyo. Over the course of a year, a great number of captivating seasonal festivals and events are held here. These include the popular Katsushika Noryo Fireworks Festival; historic festivals such as Koshin Eve at the Shibamata Taishakuten temple and the end-of-winter festivities of Setsubun; the Iris Festival, the largest of its kind in all of Tokyo; and the one-of-a-kind events that take place in the neighborhoods of Kameari and Tateishi. If you are going out in Katsushika, please feel free to check here first to see if any events are going on, and join us!

 

January–March

 

January 5: Hashigo-nori January 5: Hashigo-nori
Hashigo-nori, an exhibition of acrobatic ladder-climbing, is held as a bringer of good luck for the New Year. The many skills the performers show atop ladders seven meters high are well worth seeing! This event is held at several locations throughout Katsushika, including Katsushika City Hall (MAP), Taishakuten Sando (MAP), and Katsushika Hikawa Shrine (MAP).

 

January 23: Koshin Day (First of the Year) January 23: Koshin Day (First of the Year)
Koshin Day comes once every 60 days. On this day, visitors flock to the area around the Taishakuten temple for the showing of the Ita-honzon, the sacred woodblock print at Taishakuten Daikyoji (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). On Koshin Eve, which takes place the night before Koshin Day, a parade of 12-kilogram decorative battle standards called matoi takes place on the Taishakuten Sando road. Koshin Day happens five times a year.
•About Koshin Day
Koshin Day commemorates the day on which the Ita-honzon, a woodblock image of Indra said to have been carved by Nichiren (the founder of Nichiren Buddhism), was discovered at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple. After having been lost for a long period of time, the Ita-honzon was discovered during the rebuilding of the main hall of Taishakuten Daikyoji in 1779. The discovery was made on the 57th day of the sexagenary cycle, called "Koshin" in Japanese. It appears that the "Koshin" of each 60-day cycle was made a temple festival day as a result.

 

February 2: Oideyo Kameari Winter Festival 2019 February 2: Oideyo Kameari Winter Festival 2019
At Kameari Park (MAP) and Kameari Lirio Park (MAP), visitors can buy a bowl from the famed Kameari Sennin Hot Pot ("sennin" means "1,000 people," in reference to the enormous size of the pot), and purchase fine foods from around Kameari at stalls. The festival also includes events such as live performances, a flea market, and a stamp collection promotion.

 

February 3: Setsubun February 3: Setsubun
Festivities celebrating Setsubun, the last day of winter, are held at all of the temples around Katsushika. At Shibamata Taishakuten (MAP), after Taishakuten's monkey guardian deity ritually expels the red and blue demons, a bean-scattering ceremony is held.

 

March 24: Koshin Day March 24: Koshin Day
Koshin Day comes once every 60 days. On this day, visitors flock to the area around the Taishakuten temple for the showing of the Ita-honzon, the sacred woodblock print at Taishakuten Daikyoji (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). On Koshin Eve, which takes place the night before Koshin Day, a parade of 12-kilogram decorative battle standards called matoi takes place on the Taishakuten Sando road. Koshin Day happens five times a year.
•About Koshin Day
Koshin Day commemorates the day on which the Ita-honzon, a woodblock image of Indra said to have been carved by Nichiren (the founder of Nichiren Buddhism), was discovered at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple. After having been lost for a long period of time, the Ita-honzon was discovered during the rebuilding of the main hall of Taishakuten Daikyoji in 1779. The discovery was made on the 57th day of the sexagenary cycle, called "Koshin" in Japanese. It appears that the "Koshin" of each 60-day cycle was made a temple festival day as a result.

 

April–June

 

April 6?7: Shibamata Cherry Blossom Festival April 6-7: Shibamata Cherry Blossom Festival
The Cherry Blossom Festival is held in Shibamata Park (MAP), which overlooks the Edo River and the surrounding area as well as the Tora-san Museum. The best time to see the cherry blossoms is in early April.

 

Early April (provisional): Flower Festival Early April (provisional): Flower Festival
The Flower Festival, which celebrates the birthday of Buddha (April 8th), is held at Kinegawa Yakushi (Seiryuzan Rakuouin Joukouji Temple) (MAP). A plant sale and displays of ikebana and potted plants are also held at the same time.

 

Late April (provisional): Children's Festival/Children's Fishing Tournament April 21: Kid's Festival/Fishing Experience for Children
This event is held at Mizumoto Park (MAP). With activities including woodworking and koinobori (carp ornaments that are displayed in the hope that children will grow up healthy) making, the festivities are fun for the whole family, including the kids. Alongside this, for kids who like fishing, a fishing experience for children's is also held.

 

Mid-May (provisional): Katsushika Traditional Crafts Association Festival Mid-May (provisional): Katsushika Traditional Crafts Association Festival
Traditional handicrafts from Katsushika, including Edo kiriko glass and garments decorated in the handmade Tokyo tegaki yuzen style will be presented, displayed, and sold. During the festival, there will also be a space where visitors can make their own handicrafts. The 2019 edition will be held at Techno Plaza Katsushika (MAP).

 

May 23: Koshin Day May 23: Koshin Day
Koshin Day comes once every 60 days. On this day, visitors flock to the area around the Taishakuten temple for the showing of the Ita-honzon, the sacred woodblock print at Taishakuten Daikyoji (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). On Koshin Eve, which takes place the night before Koshin Day, a parade of 12-kilogram decorative battle standards called matoi takes place on the Taishakuten Sando road. Koshin Day happens five times a year.
•About Koshin Day
Koshin Day commemorates the day on which the Ita-honzon, a woodblock image of Indra said to have been carved by Nichiren (the founder of Nichiren Buddhism), was discovered at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple. After having been lost for a long period of time, the Ita-honzon was discovered during the rebuilding of the main hall of Taishakuten Daikyoji in 1779. The discovery was made on the 57th day of the sexagenary cycle, called "Koshin" in Japanese. It appears that the "Koshin" of each 60-day cycle was made a temple festival day as a result.

 

Early to Mid-June (provisional): Katsushika Iris Festival May 27-June 16: Katsushika Iris Festival
When the Japanese irises are at the height of their beauty, this festival is held at the Horikiri Shobuen(Iris Garden) (MAP) and Mizumoto Park (MAP). Events including live performances are also held during the festival.

 

See scenes from this event (2018) here

 

July–September

 

July 22: Koshin Day July 22: Koshin Day
Koshin Day comes once every 60 days. On this day, visitors flock to the area around the Taishakuten temple for the showing of the Ita-honzon, the sacred woodblock print at Taishakuten Daikyoji (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). On Koshin Eve, which takes place the night before Koshin Day, a parade of 12-kilogram decorative battle standards called matoi takes place on the Taishakuten Sando road. Koshin Day happens five times a year.
•About Koshin Day
Koshin Day commemorates the day on which the Ita-honzon, a woodblock image of Indra said to have been carved by Nichiren (the founder of Nichiren Buddhism), was discovered at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple. After having been lost for a long period of time, the Ita-honzon was discovered during the rebuilding of the main hall of Taishakuten Daikyoji in 1779. The discovery was made on the 57th day of the sexagenary cycle, called "Koshin" in Japanese. It appears that the "Koshin" of each 60-day cycle was made a temple festival day as a result.

 

July 23: Katsushika Noryo Fireworks Festival July 23: Katsushika Noryo Fireworks Festival
This display of fireworks takes place along the Edo River (MAP), about a 10 minute walk from Shibamata Station, and about a 20 minute walk from Kanamachi Station. The seats are right next to the launch point, providing a breathtaking view of the fireworks, and making this one of the most popular fireworks displays in all of Tokyo.

 

Late August (provisional): Tora-san Festival Late August (provisional): Tora-san Festival
Named for the beloved main character from the long-running Otoko wa Tsurai yo series of films, this summer festival is held at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). Stalls will be set up, and the Bon Festival dance will be performed. Along the Taishakuten Sando road, participants will light candles for Tora-san Night.

 

September 7 (if postponed, September 8): Furusato Katsushika Bon Festival 2019 September 7 (if postponed, September 8): Furusato Katsushika Bon Festival 2019
At Katsushika Niijuku Mirai Park (MAP), events including a Kids' Dance, a wind instrument concert, and a Bon Festival dance contest will be held. Food stalls will also be set up, serving yakisoba (fried noodles), kakigori (Japanese-style shaved ice), and more.

 

Early September (provisional): Tateishi Festa Early September (provisional): Tateishi Festa
Held in the area around Keisei Tateishi Station (MAP), this festival features flamenco dancing, music events, and more.

 

Early September (provisional): Shibamata Korokuten Shrine Festival Early September (provisional): Shibamata Korokuten Shrine Festival
At the annual festival at Shibamata Korokuten Shrine (MAP), the celebrations are further enlivened by a band that takes part in the procession with the traditional lion mask float.

 

Mid-September (provisional): Kasai Shrine Festival Mid-September (provisional): Kasai Shrine Festival
The annual festival at Kasai Shrine (MAP) features a parade of portable shrines, and a performance of Kasai-bayashi, a musical form believed to have originated at Kasai Shrine.

 

September 20: Koshin Day September 20: Koshin Day
Koshin Day comes once every 60 days. On this day, visitors flock to the area around the Taishakuten temple for the showing of the Ita-honzon, the sacred woodblock print at Taishakuten Daikyoji (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). On Koshin Eve, which takes place the night before Koshin Day, a parade of 12-kilogram decorative battle standards called matoi takes place on the Taishakuten Sando road. Koshin Day happens five times a year.
•About Koshin Day
Koshin Day commemorates the day on which the Ita-honzon, a woodblock image of Indra said to have been carved by Nichiren (the founder of Nichiren Buddhism), was discovered at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple. After having been lost for a long period of time, the Ita-honzon was discovered during the rebuilding of the main hall of Taishakuten Daikyoji in 1779. The discovery was made on the 57th day of the sexagenary cycle, called "Koshin" in Japanese. It appears that the "Koshin" of each 60-day cycle was made a temple festival day as a result.

 

October–December

 

Early October (provisional): Kami Shishimai Early October (provisional): Kami Shishimai
The Kami Shishimai, or lion deity dance, is performed at the annual festival at Shibamata Hachiman Shrine (MAP). Legend has it that when the three-headed lion deity dances, the people are granted protection from ill health.

 

Mid- to Late October (provisional): Katsushika Industry Fair Mid- to Late October (provisional): Katsushika Industry Fair
At Techno Plaza Katsushika (MAP), the ward's industry associations from fields such as manufacturing, retail, tourism, agriculture, and traditional crafts will provide demonstrations and displays, offer activities, and sell their products.

 

Late October (provisional): Rope-Making Late October (provisional): Sacred rope-Making
The making of a large sacred rope is held as a festival to celebrate the harvest at Okudo Tenso Shrine (MAP). Made from the straw from rice plants, the rope is approximately 7.9 meters long. After the akumabarai (exorcism of demons), in which participants carry the rope through the neighborhood, the rope is placed below the top ornament of the shrine's large torii gate as an additional decoration. A parade of portable shrines is held the following morning.

 

Bird Day (November): Bird Day Fair Day of the Rooster: Tori-no-Ichi market
Tori-no-Ichi market is a traditional annual event in Novemver on the Day of the Rooster in Chinese zodiac calender. Tori-no-Ichi market is held at Kasai Shrine (MAP), which is known as Kanamachi's counterpart to the famed Ohtori Shrine. The shrine bustles with crowds in search of good fortune-bringing "lucky rakes" at this time of year.

 

November 2?3: Tora-san Summit 2019 November 2–3: Tora-san Summit 2019
This event is held in Katsushika's Shibamata neighborhood (MAP), the home of Tora-san, protagonist of the Japanese film series Otoko wa Tsurai yo. Representatives from locations where the series was filmed gather here to offer local products and showcase their art forms on stage. The event also includes film screenings.

 

November 16?17: Katsushika Food Festa 2019 November 16–17: Katsushika Food Festa 2019
Around 50 of Katsushika's restaurants and food manufacturers will come together for this, the ward's biggest culinary event. The festival takes place over two days every November at Shinkoiwa Park (MAP).

 

November?February (provisional): Lighting Collaboration Kanamachi November–February (provisional): Lighting Collaboration Kanamachi
A light display will be held in Kanamachi, primarily along the way from Kanamachi Station (MAP) to the Tokyo University of Science Katsushika Campus (MAP). While the lights are on, special events will also take place in the Kanamachi district.

 

November?February (provisional): Oideyo Kameari Winter Light Display 2019 November–February (provisional): Oideyo Kameari Winter illumination 2019
This illumination event will be held primarily in the vicinity of Kameari Station (MAP). While the lights are on, special events will also take place in the Kameari neighborhood.

 

November 19: Koshin Day (Last of the Year) November 19: Koshin Day (Last of the Year)
Koshin Day comes once every 60 days. On this day, visitors flock to the area around the Taishakuten temple for the showing of the Ita-honzon, the sacred woodblock print at Taishakuten Daikyoji (Shibamata Taishakuten) (MAP). On Koshin Eve, which takes place the night before Koshin Day, a parade of 12-kilogram decorative battle standards called matoi takes place on the Taishakuten Sando road. Koshin Day happens five times a year.
•About Koshin Day
Koshin Day commemorates the day on which the Ita-honzon, a woodblock image of Indra said to have been carved by Nichiren (the founder of Nichiren Buddhism), was discovered at the Taishakuten Daikyoji temple. After having been lost for a long period of time, the Ita-honzon was discovered during the rebuilding of the main hall of Taishakuten Daikyoji in 1779. The discovery was made on the 57th day of the sexagenary cycle, called "Koshin" in Japanese. It appears that the "Koshin" of each 60-day cycle was made a temple festival day as a result.

 

December 31: Shibarare Jizo Rope Untying Ceremony December 31: Shibarare Jizo Rope Untying Ceremony
The Shibarare (Bound) Jizo at the Nanzoin temple (MAP) is a guardian deity said to grant wishes when they are made while it is tied up with a rope. Once a year, on December 31st (New Year's Eve), the rope is untied in this ceremony.

 

Source: Katsushika Guidebook, the Katsushika tourism website
http://www.katsushika-kanko.com/

 

*The preceding articles are accurate as of January 2019. (They constitute an event schedule for Katsushika in 2019.)
*The dates and details of the events are subject to change. Please refer to the available information, such as the events' official websites, prior to attending.

 

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THIS ARTICLE IS BASED ON INFORMATION FROM 03 29,2019 Author:DiGJAPAN! Editorial Team

 

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